Glasgow international 2018

20 April—
7 May

Ulrike Ottinger

Ulrike Ottinger (b. 1942, Konstanz, Germany) lives and works in Berlin, Germany.  Ottinger’s work explores the world through images notable for their curiosity about different human cultures and for their visual power and intensity. Having made Pop art paintings and objects while living in Paris from 1962-68, Ottinger returned to her native Germany and in the early 1970s began an astonishing sequence of films which continues to this day, alongside a significant practice in photograph that has often been in close dialogue with her moving image works. Her work often mixes ethnographic documentary with fiction and fantasy, creating unforgettable juxtapositions and encounters.  Amongst Ottinger’s most notable early feature-length films are Madame X—An Absolute Ruler (1977) and the “Berlin trilogy” of Ticket Of No Return (1979), Freak Orlando (1981) and Dorian Gray In The Mirror Of The Yellow Press (1984).

A series of quasi-ethnographic documentaries followed, including China. The Arts – The People (1985), Johanna D’arc Of Mongolia (1989), the eight-hour Taiga (1992). Subsequent projects include films applying an ethnographic lens to Ottinger’s own culture, such as Countdown (1990), and Prater (2007), and further epic travelogues, including in 2016 Chamisso’s Shadow, a four-part, eleven and a half hour film shot in the Bering Sea, which was awarded “Best Documentary 2016” by the German Film Critics Association.

Solo shows include: Ulrike Ottinger: Chamissos Schatten,  Galerie Johanna Breede Photokunst, Berlin (2015); Ulrike Ottinger: Floating Food Haus der Kulturen der Welt, Berlin, Germany (2011) Hannah-Höch-Price: Ulrike Ottinger. n.b.k., Berlin, Germany (2011), Bild Archive Witte-de-With Museum, Rotterdam (2004).

Group exhibitions include: Still (the) Barbarians EVA International, Limerick, Ireland (2016); The World Goes Pop. Tate Modern, London (2015) Burning Down the House, the 10th Gwangju Biennale, Korea (2014);  Documenta 11, Kassel, Germany (2002).

Ulrike Ottinger

Still Moving: the Films and Photographs of Ulrike Ottinger

Exhibition
Screening

The Hunterian presents a solo exhibition of moving image works and photographs by the internationally renowned filmmaker and artist Ulrike Ottinger, accompanied by a retrospective screening of her key films.

Among Ottinger’s major works are the ‘Berlin Trilogy’ (1979-1984), the feature film Johanna d’Arc of Mongolia (1989) – an incredible journey on the Trans-Siberian Railway that takes a motley company of western women to the wilds of Inner Mongolia – and, applying an ethnographic lens to marginal European cultures, Twelve Chairs (2004) and Southeast Passage (2002).

Supported by Glasgow International and the Goethe Institut.

Fri 20 April – Sun 29 July
Mon – Sat, 10am-5pm
Sun, 11am-4pm

Ulrike Ottinger

Still Moving: Ticket of No Return, 1979

Event
Screening

The first film in Ulrike Ottinger’s ‘Berlin Trilogy’ presents one woman’s journey through the city – and through alcohol – to the point of destruction. With stunning costumes, a carefully constructed colour palette, and vivid use of Berlin as a backdrop, the film combines visual brilliance with a sharply satirical script. Its cast includes Ottinger’s frequent collaborator Tabea Blumenschein, American-born film star Eddie Constantine, and punk singer Nina Hagen, with guest appearances from artists Martin Kippenberger and Wolf Vostell.

£3-£4; Book via Eventbrite.

Buy a Season Ticket to all Ulrike Ottinger – ‘Still Moving’ screenings.

For information on more events around the Ulrike Ottinger exhibition, see Mobilisations, a programme by students of the Masters in Curatorial Practice (Contemporary Art) course.

Mon 23 April, 5-7pm

Ulrike Ottinger

Still Moving: Freak Orlando, 1981

Event
Screening

Freak Orlando, the second film in Ulrike Ottinger’s ‘Berlin Trilogy,’ is an extraordinary collision of images and stories. Bringing together references ranging from Tod Browning’s notorious 1932 film Freaks to Virginia Woolf’s gender-troubling, time-travelling Orlando (1928) and Goya’s etchings, the work reimagines world history as a parade of ugliness, animated by strange rituals. Berlin appears here as a post-apocalyptic backdrop, and marginalised bodies take centre stage in a reimagining of aesthetic and social norms. The cast includes Ottinger’s frequent collaborators Delphine Seyrig and Magdalena Montezuma, each playing multiple recurring characters.

£3-£4; Book via Eventbrite.

Buy a Season Ticket to all Ulrike Ottinger: ‘Still Moving’ screenings.

For information on more events around the Ulrike Ottinger exhibition, see Mobilisations, a programme by students of the Masters in Curatorial Practice (Contemporary Art) course.

Fri 27 April, 5-7.30pm

Ulrike Ottinger

Still Moving: Dorian Gray in the Mirror of the Yellow Press, 1984

Event
Screening

Like Freak Orlando, the third of the ‘Berlin Trilogy’ brings together two iconic modern works. Here the points of departure are Oscar Wilde’s ageless libertine hero Dorian Gray, and the demonic anti-hero Dr Mabuse (protagonist of three films made by Fritz Lang from the 1920s to the 1960s). Ottinger reworks these characters in significant ways, with Dorian portrayed androgynously by actress, model and artist Veruschka von Lehndorff, and Mabuse played by Delphine Seyrig as a media mogul set on world domination. This narrative is inter-cut with an opera relating the Spanish conquest of the Canary Islands, creating a parallel account of power and appropriation. Dorian Gray in the Mirror of the Yellow Press is dystopian fairy tale reflecting on the power of media images, and shot through with Ottinger’s trademark visual inventiveness and wit.

Presented in association with ‘Filming Ruins’, organised by Dr Dominic Paterson and supported by The Chancellor’s Fund,University of Glasgow.

£3-£4; Book via Eventbrite.

Buy a Season Ticket to all Ulrike Ottinger: ‘Still Moving’ screenings.

For information on more events around the Ulrike Ottinger exhibition, see Mobilisations, a programme by students of the Masters in Curatorial Practice (Contemporary Art) course.

Sun 29 April, 3-5.30pm

Ulrike Ottinger

Still Moving: Johanna d’Arc of Mongolia, 1989

Event
Screening

Johanna d’Arc of Mongolia is an extraordinary blend of fiction and ethnographic documentary. We follow a group of Westerners on the Trans-Siberian railway as they dine, converse and perform songs to entertain each other on the journey. This miscellaneous group are taken hostage by the fierce Mongolian princess Ulan Iga (Xu Re Huar), and spend a summer as captives in her nomadic tent village, where they learn rituals of hospitality and kinship. Delphine Seyrig (in her final film role) plays Lady Windermere, an ethnologist who also speaks Mongolian. Lady Windermere becomes the de facto leader of the women, and takes the young backpacker ‘Giovanna d’Arco’ (Inès Sastre) under her wing.

Presented in association with ‘Filming Ruins’, organised by Dr Dominic Paterson and supported by The Chancellor’s Fund,University of Glasgow.

£3-£4; Book via Eventbrite.

Buy a Season Ticket to all Ulrike Ottinger: ‘Still Moving’ screenings.

For information on more events around the Ulrike Ottinger exhibition, see Mobilisations, a programme by students of the Masters in Curatorial Practice (Contemporary Art) course.

Mon 30 April, 5-7.30pm

Ulrike Ottinger

Still Moving: Korean Wedding Chest, 2008

Event
Screening

Ulrike Ottinger’s exploration of love and marriage in South Korea traces rituals both ancient and contemporary, ranging from traditional temples to the mega-city of Seoul, with its beauty parlours and secular wedding venues. With an eye equally attuned to the humorous, kitsch and the profound, The Korean Wedding Chest is typical of Ottinger’s sensitivity to contradiction and complexity. The film’s central motif is the creation and unpacking of the old-fashioned wedding chest of the title: Ottinger shows us how modern myths and rites contain the old within them, and vice versa.

£3-£4; Book via Eventbrite.

Buy a Season Ticket to all Ulrike Ottinger: ‘Still Moving’ screenings.

For information on more events around the Ulrike Ottinger exhibition, see Mobilisations, a programme by students of the Masters in Curatorial Practice (Contemporary Art) course.

Fri 4 May, 5-7pm

Ulrike Ottinger

Still Moving: Under Snow, 2011

Event
Screening

Under Snow is one of Ulrike Ottinger’s most beautiful films, with her camera patiently observing daily life in the snow-bound landscapes of northwestern Japan. As with the earlier Johanna d’Arc of Mongolia, Ottinger blends documentary footage with performance; here this plays out through Kabuki sequences relaying the tale of students Takeo and Marko. Their journey through the past and repeated encounters with the present find them wondrously transformed with help from a beautiful vixen fox. The film is narrated in English by the American critical theorist Lawrence A. Rickels, a noted interpreter of Ottinger’s work.

£3-£4; Book via Eventbrite.

Buy a Season Ticket to all Ulrike Ottinger: ‘Still Moving’ screenings.

For information on more events around the Ulrike Ottinger exhibition, see Mobilisations, a programme by students of the Masters in Curatorial Practice (Contemporary Art) course.

Mon 7 May 7, 5-7pm

Ulrike Ottinger

Artist Talk

Event
Talk

For Glasgow International Festival of Visual Art 2018, The Hunterian presents Still Moving: The films and photographs of Ulrike Ottinger, the first Scottish exhibition of renowned Berlin-based artist Ulrike Ottinger. Join Ulrike and Hunterian curator Dr Dominic Paterson at the Goethe Institut to hear her introduce the exhibition and her wider artistic practice.

Free; booking required. Book via Eventbrite.

Friday 20 April, 3-4pm

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Glasgow international 2018