Glasgow International 2020

E. Jane

Lavendra

Director's Programme
Exhibition

Lavendra is the name given by American artist and sound designer E. Jane to a fantastical brown dwarf star, an imagined planetary cosmos ‘stabilised’ for human presence by the harmonising influence of 1990s black pop divas including Aaliyah, Whitney Houston and Toni Braxton.

In the historic Kelvin Hall, visitors encounter an intimate space that has been soaked in gradients of pink, purple and blue light and contains collages and fan-style music videos filmed in domestic space that splice these spaces with images of the artist performing in video-collaged environments. It’s a scenario that in particular allows E. Jane’s diva alter-ego, MHYSA to come through. MHYSA performs in these videos, in live solo performances and in performace art and music duo SCRAAATCH alongside producer lawd knows.

Taking in themes associated with Afrofuturism, Lavendra is driven by both a sense of what might be magical in the internet era – when identity and representation are given a heightened digital public platform – as well as a desire to heal.

Supported by Glasgow International, Glasgow Museums and the Henry Moore Foundation.

Fri 20 April – Mon 7 May
Mon – Sun 10am – 6pm

Hardeep Pandhal

Self-Loathing Flashmob

Director's Programme
Exhibition

Hardeep Pandhal creates a new installation in the institutional environs of Kelvin Hall’s foyer and dancehall.

The work of Pandhal carries a satirical and acerbic cartoonish drawing style, employed across different media including sculpture and animation. He often draws upon his background as a second generation British Sikh raised in the industrial West Midlands city of Birmingham to reflect on the psychological and material effects of assimilation in broader society.

Surrounded by a motley crew of schizoid figures that block and ‘guide’ us with their dissimulating voices, a speculative vision presented on old and new monitors forms a large sculptural monolith. Here, digital drawings deface and reinterpret fragments of video footage shot by Pandhal in a university lecture theatre during its occupation by student protestors in response to the 2010 UK governmental cuts to education.

With this large-scale work, stretching across two floors, he presents an upturned world suggesting that whilst technology might mutate, evolve and eventually slip into obsolescence, the sociopathic tendencies of the ‘totalising eye’ remain dangerously consistent.

Commissioned by Glasgow International.

Supported by Glasgow Museums and the Artist Residency Programme at Cove Park.

Please be aware that this exhibition contains language and imagery of a violent and sexual nature.

Thu 20 April – Mon 7 May
Mon – Sun 10am – 6pm

Partially accessible

Lubaina Himid in Conversation with Mother Tongue

Event
Talk

Having transformed the main hall of Kelvingrove Art Gallery with her commission for GI 2018 – Breaking in, Breaking out, Breaking up, Breaking down, Lubaina Himid is joined in conversation with Mother Tongue (Tiffany Boyle & Jessica Carden), discussing her new work, her personal connection to Glasgow, and wider themes of overlooked histories within art and culture, in particular those of people of colour. 

Free, booking required. Book via Eventbrite.

Sat 21 April, 2pm-3pm

Ulrike Ottinger

Still Moving: Ticket of No Return, 1979

Event
Screening

The first film in Ulrike Ottinger’s ‘Berlin Trilogy’ presents one woman’s journey through the city – and through alcohol – to the point of destruction. With stunning costumes, a carefully constructed colour palette, and vivid use of Berlin as a backdrop, the film combines visual brilliance with a sharply satirical script. Its cast includes Ottinger’s frequent collaborator Tabea Blumenschein, American-born film star Eddie Constantine, and punk singer Nina Hagen, with guest appearances from artists Martin Kippenberger and Wolf Vostell.

£3-£4; Book via Eventbrite.

Buy a Season Ticket to all Ulrike Ottinger – ‘Still Moving’ screenings.

For information on more events around the Ulrike Ottinger exhibition, see Mobilisations, a programme by students of the Masters in Curatorial Practice (Contemporary Art) course.

Mon 23 April, 5-7pm

Ulrike Ottinger

Still Moving: Freak Orlando, 1981

Event
Screening

Freak Orlando, the second film in Ulrike Ottinger’s ‘Berlin Trilogy,’ is an extraordinary collision of images and stories. Bringing together references ranging from Tod Browning’s notorious 1932 film Freaks to Virginia Woolf’s gender-troubling, time-travelling Orlando (1928) and Goya’s etchings, the work reimagines world history as a parade of ugliness, animated by strange rituals. Berlin appears here as a post-apocalyptic backdrop, and marginalised bodies take centre stage in a reimagining of aesthetic and social norms. The cast includes Ottinger’s frequent collaborators Delphine Seyrig and Magdalena Montezuma, each playing multiple recurring characters.

£3-£4; Book via Eventbrite.

Buy a Season Ticket to all Ulrike Ottinger: ‘Still Moving’ screenings.

For information on more events around the Ulrike Ottinger exhibition, see Mobilisations, a programme by students of the Masters in Curatorial Practice (Contemporary Art) course.

Fri 27 April, 5-7.30pm

Ulrike Ottinger

Still Moving: Dorian Gray in the Mirror of the Yellow Press, 1984

Event
Screening

Like Freak Orlando, the third of the ‘Berlin Trilogy’ brings together two iconic modern works. Here the points of departure are Oscar Wilde’s ageless libertine hero Dorian Gray, and the demonic anti-hero Dr Mabuse (protagonist of three films made by Fritz Lang from the 1920s to the 1960s). Ottinger reworks these characters in significant ways, with Dorian portrayed androgynously by actress, model and artist Veruschka von Lehndorff, and Mabuse played by Delphine Seyrig as a media mogul set on world domination. This narrative is inter-cut with an opera relating the Spanish conquest of the Canary Islands, creating a parallel account of power and appropriation. Dorian Gray in the Mirror of the Yellow Press is dystopian fairy tale reflecting on the power of media images, and shot through with Ottinger’s trademark visual inventiveness and wit.

Presented in association with ‘Filming Ruins’, organised by Dr Dominic Paterson and supported by The Chancellor’s Fund,University of Glasgow.

£3-£4; Book via Eventbrite.

Buy a Season Ticket to all Ulrike Ottinger: ‘Still Moving’ screenings.

For information on more events around the Ulrike Ottinger exhibition, see Mobilisations, a programme by students of the Masters in Curatorial Practice (Contemporary Art) course.

Sun 29 April, 3-5.30pm

Ulrike Ottinger

Still Moving: Johanna d’Arc of Mongolia, 1989

Event
Screening

Johanna d’Arc of Mongolia is an extraordinary blend of fiction and ethnographic documentary. We follow a group of Westerners on the Trans-Siberian railway as they dine, converse and perform songs to entertain each other on the journey. This miscellaneous group are taken hostage by the fierce Mongolian princess Ulan Iga (Xu Re Huar), and spend a summer as captives in her nomadic tent village, where they learn rituals of hospitality and kinship. Delphine Seyrig (in her final film role) plays Lady Windermere, an ethnologist who also speaks Mongolian. Lady Windermere becomes the de facto leader of the women, and takes the young backpacker ‘Giovanna d’Arco’ (Inès Sastre) under her wing.

Presented in association with ‘Filming Ruins’, organised by Dr Dominic Paterson and supported by The Chancellor’s Fund,University of Glasgow.

£3-£4; Book via Eventbrite.

Buy a Season Ticket to all Ulrike Ottinger: ‘Still Moving’ screenings.

For information on more events around the Ulrike Ottinger exhibition, see Mobilisations, a programme by students of the Masters in Curatorial Practice (Contemporary Art) course.

Mon 30 April, 5-7.30pm

Ulrike Ottinger

Still Moving: Korean Wedding Chest, 2008

Event
Screening

Ulrike Ottinger’s exploration of love and marriage in South Korea traces rituals both ancient and contemporary, ranging from traditional temples to the mega-city of Seoul, with its beauty parlours and secular wedding venues. With an eye equally attuned to the humorous, kitsch and the profound, The Korean Wedding Chest is typical of Ottinger’s sensitivity to contradiction and complexity. The film’s central motif is the creation and unpacking of the old-fashioned wedding chest of the title: Ottinger shows us how modern myths and rites contain the old within them, and vice versa.

£3-£4; Book via Eventbrite.

Buy a Season Ticket to all Ulrike Ottinger: ‘Still Moving’ screenings.

For information on more events around the Ulrike Ottinger exhibition, see Mobilisations, a programme by students of the Masters in Curatorial Practice (Contemporary Art) course.

Fri 4 May, 5-7pm

Ulrike Ottinger

Still Moving: Under Snow, 2011

Event
Screening

Under Snow is one of Ulrike Ottinger’s most beautiful films, with her camera patiently observing daily life in the snow-bound landscapes of northwestern Japan. As with the earlier Johanna d’Arc of Mongolia, Ottinger blends documentary footage with performance; here this plays out through Kabuki sequences relaying the tale of students Takeo and Marko. Their journey through the past and repeated encounters with the present find them wondrously transformed with help from a beautiful vixen fox. The film is narrated in English by the American critical theorist Lawrence A. Rickels, a noted interpreter of Ottinger’s work.

£3-£4; Book via Eventbrite.

Buy a Season Ticket to all Ulrike Ottinger: ‘Still Moving’ screenings.

For information on more events around the Ulrike Ottinger exhibition, see Mobilisations, a programme by students of the Masters in Curatorial Practice (Contemporary Art) course.

Mon 7 May 7, 5-7pm

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Programme

Glasgow international 2018