Glasgow
international
Digital Programme:
23 April -
31 May 2020

Following the postponement of Gi to 2021, please check out our digital programme below. Keep up to date with our work at

An audio introduction from Glasgow International

Glasgow International Director Richard Parry introduces the online programme.

volume_up

Audio content

08:10 minutes

Browse Gi’s Artist’s Editions

Georgina Starr
Yesterday, 1991

Georgina Starr’s Yesterday (1991) is one of the artist’s first sound works. Recorded almost 30 years ago, when she was alone in the corridors of the Slade School of Art, the haunting tune reflects a melancholia for returning to the past:

‘One night while working late at college I stood in an empty corridor and whistled Yesterday. It sounded beautiful and melancholic. I wanted other people to hear the sound of me whistling alone in this resonant space, so I recorded myself and set up hidden speakers connected to a tape player in my locker. The next day the tune played on and off throughout the day. Some people heard it, some didn’t. It was a secret communication without words, unannounced and unidentifiable. This is a recording of me whistling Yesterday, yesterday and heard today.’

Courtesy of the artist.

For Gi2020, Georgina Starr was due to present her new film commission Quarantaine as well as the sculptural performance installation Moment Memory Monument.

volume_up

Audio content

02:15 minutes

Sign up to the mailing list

Alberta Whittle
business as usual : hostile environment, 2020

Scottish-Barbadian artist Alberta Whittle presents a working iteration of the project business as usual: hostile environment. Originally co-commissioned with Glasgow Sculpture Studios with the support of EventScotland in celebration of the Year of Coasts and Waters 2020, the project was conceived to explore Glasgow’s Forth and Clyde Canal as both a literal and poetic route through which to reflect on the role of waterways in the voluntary and involuntary movement of people. Reworking aspects of the new film at speed and in light of the Covid-19 outbreak, Whittle powerfully incorporates archival footage relating to the UK’s Windrush scandal as well as material highlighting the role of immigrants in the NHS as they tackle the virus, foregrounding how political and ecological climates intersect and shape one another.

Courtesy of the artist.

This is a new commission for Gi2020’s digital programme.

To find out more about Alberta Whittle’s project for Gi2020, please visit her exhibition page here.

play_arrow

Video content

16:04 minutes

Donate to support Gi in 2021

Yuko Mohri
Everything Flows - distance, 2020

Yuko Mohri is best known for her sculpture and installations comprising found objects and kinetics, often incorporating aspects of chance. Here, in making a new video for our digital programme, she splices together scenes in Yasujirō Ozu’s acclaimed film Tokyo Story (1953) where no humans are present. Ozu’s film tells the story of an elderly couple visiting their children, who are now adults and whom pay their elderly parents scant attention. Much of it is set within small domestic interiors, with fixed camera shots and with much of the ‘action’ taking place off camera, such that its tempo, setting and themes all strongly resonate with our current circumstances, as does Mohri’s eerie subversion.

This is presented alongside her earlier film Everything Flowsinterval (2018), which similarly extracts a sequence of various objects swaying from Dziga Vertov’s documentary film Man with a Movie Camera (1929).

Courtesy of the artist, mother’s tankstation and project fulfill.

Video editing: Kazuya Kato.

This is a new commission for Gi2020’s digital programme.

To find out more about Yuko Mohri’s project for Gi2020, please visit her exhibition page here.

play_arrow

Video content

08:06 minutes

Yuko Mohri
Everything Flows - interval, 2018
play_arrow

Video content

07:31 minutes

Browse Gi’s Artist’s Editions

Jenkin van Zyl
In Vitro (all the love mix), 2020

Jenkin van Zyl (b.1993) is an artist based in London with a multidisciplinary practice comprising film, performance, writing, sculpture and cake production. They present here In Vitro (all the love mix), a remix of bonus footage shot at the frozen landscapes from In Vitro (2020, 40 minutes), the film at the centre of a labyrinth within their installation being developed for Gi2021.

In Vitro (2020) moves from the vast into the claustrophobic. Gliding over the frozen tumulus’ of a faux-Viking film set in Iceland, we descend into a coup of subterranean bunkers. Inside is a soiled lottery, where a cast of ghouls role-play love, re-enchantment and oblivion in a parody of the overwhelming horror that is flooding their refuge chamber. Despite it being clear that they are trapped by ambivalent forces of fate, they cling onto fragments of possibility in a call to connect and proliferate.

In Vitro (all the love mix) is performed by Alex Margo Arden as Number 97, Kevin Brennan as Number 163, and Jenkin van Zyl as Ted Rogers’s Number 237.

This is a new commission for Gi2020’s digital programme.

To find out more about Jenkin Van Zyl’s installation for Gi2020, please see their exhibition page here.

play_arrow

Video content

04:45 minutes

Sign up to the mailing list

Liv Fontaine
Some People Say - 2020

Some People Say is a new audio work by artist Liv Fontaine who was part of the performance programme Hubris presented by Glasgow not-for profit gallery Civic Room for Gi2020. Opening with the confrontational vocals and frenetic energy of the artist’s live performances, a surreal conversation between Fontaine’s alter ego, Viv Insane and her partner Jim, charts the character’s descent into sickness — climaxing with her transformation into a reptile. Fontaine uses fantasy and searing sarcasm to confront illness and the absurd demands made on the female body within a patriarchal society.

Courtesy of the artist.

Alex Neilson on Drums and Edwin Stevens on Guitar.

This is a new commission for Gi2020’s digital programme.

To find out more about Civic Room’s performance programme Hubris, please visit their exhibition page here.

Please note that this work contains explicit language.

volume_up

Audio content

08:38 minutes

Donate to support Gi in 2021

Sarah Forrest
The Unreliable Narrator, 2019

Glasgow-based artist and filmmaker Sarah Forrest presents The Unreliable Narrator, a short film in which a magician performs close magic and cardistry to camera. The title of the work, The Unreliable Narrator, could be understood simply as a warning to be cautious, like a pre-emptive nudge signalling that care should be taken as to who or what is believed. As someone whose stock in trade is the art of deception the magician conjures a narrative that we knowingly enter into even though we understand it is false. However, throughout the film the position or identity of the named narrator is left ambiguously open, bringing attention to the sleight of hand and potential duplicity of not only the magician but also the filmmaker. The onward march of the film’s timeline is compromised by the Gi2020 digital programme, handing control of the image over to the viewer who can slow down, replay and perhaps reveal the mechanics of the illusion.

Originally commissioned by Hospitalfield, Arbroath, 2019. Courtesy of the artist.

To find out more about Sarah Forrest’s new film commission for Gi2021 drawing on a detective novel, which would have shown at Langside Halls for Gi2020, please see her exhibition page here.

play_arrow

Video content

11:09 minutes

Browse Gi’s Artist’s Editions

Urara Tsuchiya
Give us a Meow, 2019

Glasgow-based artist Urara Tsuchiya works mainly with performance, video, and live events, often incorporating soft sculpture, costumes, ceramics and home cooking. Tsuchiya, who has been sequestered northern Italy, since the country went into lockdown in early March, shows the video Give us a Meow (2019), first shown as part of an installation at Frieze Art Fair last year. Set in the countryside, a remote cottage becomes an environment where out of the ordinary behaviours take place. Tsuchiya takes us through a day of wanted or unwanted solitude in a variety of self-made costumes, stumbling and dancing in what appears to be an entranced and captivated state.

Film by Ben Toms, edited by Adam Aftanas, soundtrack by Jack Brennan and Arjan Stockhausen, costumes by Urara Tsuchiya and, Zephyr Liddell and Saira Harvey.

Courtesy of the artist and Union Pacific.

To find out more about Urara Tsuchiya’s project for Gi2020, please visit her exhibition page here.

play_arrow

Video content

08:58 minutes

Sign up to the mailing list

Panel Discussion: Shifting Attention
Richard Parry in discussion with Brian Dillon, Orit Gat and Stefanie Hessler

This recorded discussion between writers Brian Dillon and Orit Gat, Curator Stefanie Hessler and Gi Director Richard Parry explores the ways the resonance of the festival’s theme Attention has changed in light of the COVID-19 crisis. While Writer and Critic Brian Dillon (UK Editor of Cabinet magazine) talks about the history of attention and current shifts from public to private spaces, writer Orit Gat (Contributing Editor at White Review) works at the intersection of contemporary art and digital culture, focusing on developments in the attention economy. Curator Stefanie Hessler (Director at Kunsthall Trondheim) gives insights into her research on sense perception in relation to the theme of attention and how this is embedded in her curatorial practice.

Supported by Goethe Institut Glasgow.

 

volume_up

Audio content

54:59 minutes

Donate to support Gi in 2021

TJ Clark
Attention to What?

TJ Clark’s pioneering work as an art historian is characterised by the meticulous attention he pays to artworks and to the social conditions within which they are made and viewed. In this recording of a public lecture given in March 2020, Clark discusses the ways we pay attention to artworks through the particular example of a 1917 painting by Henri Matisse.

The event was presented a part of the Material/Immaterial season at the School of Culture & Creative Arts at the University of Glasgow in collaboration with Glasgow International 2020, and in response to the 2020 theme Attention.

play_arrow

Video content

1:15:47 minutes

Browse Gi’s Artist’s Editions