Glasgow International Festival of Contemporary Art

Delainia: 17071965 Unfolding

A room with white walls and white fabric hanging from the ceiling which are painted with brightly coloured shapes and body parts. At the centre of the room sits a person in a long pink dress with red hair. Their face is covered by a blue and white mask.
A white room with white fabric hanging from the ceiling. On the walls outlines of human figures are painted. In the centre of the room is a canvas on a frame held up by 6 legs resembling human legs.
Dates and Opening times

Fri 7 June – Sun 13 October

 

Fri 7 – Sun 23 June
Mon – Fri & Sun, 12pm – 5pm
Sat, 12pm – 6pm

 

Fri 7 June, 10am - 5pm
Wed 12 June, 12pm - 7pm
Fri 14 June 12pm - 7pm 

 

26 June – 13 October
Wed – Fri & Sun, 12pm – 5pm 
Sat, 12pm – 6pm

Venue

Tramway
25 Albert Drive
G41 2PE

Participants
Delaine Le Bas
Presented by

Tramway and Glasgow International 

Supported by

Co-commissioned by Tramway and Glasgow International. With thanks to Paradise Nantes, France and RTA Studio Findon, U.K.

Accessiblity

Good access: The venue has ramped or level access and/or lifts to access upper floors


Toilets: The venue has toilets available for visitors


Accessible Toilets: The venue has a wheelchair-accessible toilet


Gender Neutral: The venue has toilets not separated by gender or sex


Refreshments: There is a café or somewhere you can purchase refreshments


Baby Change: The venue has baby change facilities


Bike Rack: there is cycle parking at the venue


For detailed information about access provision at Tramway, please see here

Delainia: 17071965 Unfolding is an exhibition of work by artist Delaine Le Bas presented within an expansive and layered installation. Delaine’s objects, environments, textiles, costumes and performances exist at the intersection of the personal and the political, aligning their experiences as a Romani person with perspectives on land, movement, gender, and discrimination. 

Across the exhibition, Delaine evokes forms of social and psychological commentary through the recurrent use of texts, the reactivation of personal and archival ephemera, and symbols from classical mythology and popular culture. The installations are populated by a cast of extraordinary figures such as goddesses, visionaries and witches, applying a feminist lens to narratives of both emancipation and domination.

Tramway was previously the Glasgow site of To Gypsyland, 2013, a travelling research project by Delaine and collaborator Barby Asante that explored Romani, Gypsy and Traveller presence in cities across the UK. In the intertwining of elements from past projects with new figures and narratives, Delainia reflects the ongoing address in the work of the mythologisation and demonisation of Romani, Gypsy and Traveller peoples in the UK and Europe. These concerns are amplified within present-day contexts of housing crisis, border control, forced displacement and environmental breakdown. Delaine’s work activates and reclaims space for new rituals and imaginaries of resistance against historical and contemporary environments of hostility.